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  ENGLISH GRAMMAR  
Alphabet
Vowels & Consonants
Word Building
Sentences
Articles
Cardinal-Ordinal Numbers
Noun
Pronoun
Verb
Adverb
Adjective
Preposition
Conjunction
Interjection
Tenses
Opposites
Active & Passive Voice
Direct & Indirect Speech
Vocabulary
ADVERB
Types of Adverb Adverb of Time Adverb of Frequency Adverb of Place
Adverb of Manner Adverb of Quality Adverb of Reason Adverb of Duration
Adverb of Affirmation Adverb of Conjunction Relative Adverbs Interrogative Adverbs
Degree of Comparison Positive-Comparative-Superlative Formation of Adverb
RELATIVE ADVERBS

Relative Adverbs used to connect the subordinate clause to the main part of the sentence. These are where, when, why. Like the relative pronouns, they are joining words. They are called relative adverbs because they relate or refer to an antecedent (that is, something that has gone before). The antecedent may be clearly stated or understood.

  WHERE

This is the restaurant where I have my dinner.

Here the adverb where is used to connect the subordinate clause / have my dinner to the main part of the sentence. The restaurant is the antecedent of the relative adverb where. The antecedent is clearly stated. ‘Where’ can be replaced by at which.

This is the restaurant at which I have my dinner.

But sometimes, the antecedent is only understood and not openly stated.
This is where (=the place at which) I have my dinner.

 
More Examples
Tell me the office where (=in which) you work.
I don't remember where (=the place at which) I lost my pen.
I visited the city where I grew up.
This is the place where we first met.
This is the store where I bought my books.
Do you know a shop where I can buy used laptops ?
I know the house where he lives.
This is the house where Tanya was born.
  WHEN

(a) I remember the day when (=on which) I first saw her.
(b) I cannot forget the years when (=during which) I was at college.
(c) Sunday is when (=the day on which) I go to church/temple, see movie.

In first sentence we can use that in place of when. ‘When’ can also be dropped altogether. eg.

I remember the day (that) I first saw her.
But we cannot replace or omit when in sentence b & c.

 
More Examples
I remember the day when we first met.
My favorite season is fall, when all the leaves change color.
I don’t know the day when he came.
There was a very hot summer the year when (= in which) he was born.
I can't remember a time when I was so happy.
The most stressful day of the week is Monday, when we go back to work.
My favorite month is always February, when we celebrate Valentine's Day.
  WHY

The reason why this man comes here is not clear.

Here why can be replaced with for which. It can also be omitted altogether. eg.

There is no reason why ( = for which) we should meet him.
(here ‘why’ can’t be left out).

 
More Examples
Tell me why you were late home.
Do you know the reason why the stores are closed today?
I understand the reason why Marry got the lead.
That was one reason why I never wanted to do that again.
I don’t know the reason why Rahul isn’t in class today.
Do you know the reason why Delsy cried?
Tell me (the reason) why you were late home.
  (why = for which, but could replace the whole phrase 'the reason for which')
The reason why I didn't call you is that I've lost your cell number.
You may also like to see
Types of Adverb Adverb of Time Adverb of Frequency Adverb of Place
Adverb of Manner Adverb of Quality Adverb of Reason Adverb of Duration
Adverb of Affirmation Adverb of Conjunction Relative Adverbs Interrogative Adverbs
Degree of Comparison Positive-Comparative-Superlative Formation of Adverb