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  ENGLISH GRAMMAR  
Alphabet
Vowels & Consonants
Word Building
Sentences
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Cardinal-Ordinal Numbers
Noun
Pronoun
Verb
Adverb
Adjective
Preposition
Conjunction
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Active & Passive Voice
Direct & Indirect Speech
Vocabulary
TENSES
Kinds of Tenses Tense Table
Simple Present Present Continuous Present Perfect Present Perfect Continuous
Simple Past Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect Continuous
Simple Future Future Continuous Future Perfect Future Perfect Continuous
Present Conditional Tense Conditional Sentences
CONDITIONAL SENTENCES

What is Conditional Sentence?

A Conditional Sentence has two parts:

1. If clause and
2. Main Clause.

  Example
  If Clause Main Clause
If you come in time, we will go to see a movie.
  (It means, if you come in time, we will go to see a movie and If you don’t come in time, we will not go to see a movie).

The Conditional sentences are of three kinds:

  Example
Possibility or likely Condition If you ask him money, he will give it to you.
Unlikely or imaginary Condition If you ask him for money, he would give it to you.
Impossible Condition If you had asked him for money, he would have given it to you.

We can use – If, Can, Could, May, Might, Unless, Whenever, Whenever, Whatever, Whichever (in place of ‘if not’) to form Conditional Tenses.

The following are uses of Conditional Sentences:

If + Simple present with Simple present.
If + Simple present with Simple future.
If + Simple past with Present conditional.
If + Past perfect with Perfect conditional.
If + Past perfect with Present conditional.
USES OF CONDITIONAL SENTENCES:
  If + Simple Present with Simple Present.
Where the tense in both parts of the sentence is the simple present:
 
'If' Clause + Main Clause
Simple Present + Simple Present
If it rains,   you get wet.
If you heat ice,   it melts.
Note: In these sentences, the time is now or always and the situation is real and possible. They are often used to refer to general truths.
  If + Simple Present with Simple Future.
Where the tense in the 'if clause is the simple present, and the tense in the main clause is the simple future:
 
'If' Clause + Main Clause
Simple Present + Simple Future
If it rains,   you will get wet.
If I know the answer,   I will tell you.
If you work hard,   you will pass.
If you don't hurry,   we will miss the train.
If you study regularly,   you will do well in exams.
If he goes early,   he will meet him.
Note: In these sentences, the time is the present or future and the situation is real. They refer to a possible condition and its probable result.
(It is an open Condition which may or may not be fulfilled)
  If + Simple Past with Present Conditional.
Where the tense in the 'if' clause is the simple past, and the tense in the main clause is the present conditional:
 
'If' Clause + Main Clause
Simple Past + Present Conditional
If it rained,   you would get wet.
If I were a bird,   I would fly.
If I knew the answer,   I would tell you.
If you went to bed earlier,   you wouldn't be so tired.
Note:
In these sentences, the time is now or any time, and the situation is unreal or imaginary. They are not based on fact, and they refer to an unlikely or hypothetical condition and its probable result.
  If + Past Perfect with Perfect Conditional.
Where the tense in the 'if' clause is the past perfect, and the tense in the main clause is the perfect conditional:
 
'If' Clause + Main Clause
Past Perfect + Perfect Conditional
If it had rained,   you would have got wet.
If you had worked harder,   you would have passed the exam.
Note:
In these sentences, the time is past, and the situation is contrary to reality. The facts they are based on are the opposite of what is expressed, and they refer to an unreal past condition and its probable past result.
  If + Past Perfect with Present Conditional.
Where the tense in the 'if' clause is the past perfect, and the tense in the main clause is the present conditional:
 
'If' Clause + Main Clause
Past Perfect + Present Conditional
If we had looked at the map,   we wouldn't be lost.
If I had worked harder at school,   I would have a better job now.
Note:
In these sentences, the time is past in the 'if' clause, and present in the main clause. They refer to an unreal past condition and its probable result in the present.
You may also like to see
Kinds of Tenses Tense Table
Simple Present Present Continuous Present Perfect Present Perfect Continuous
Simple Past Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect Continuous
Simple Future Future Continuous Future Perfect Future Perfect Continuous
Present Conditional Tense Conditional Sentences