Basic English : Punctuation Marks
USES OF PUNCTUATION MARKS
Full Stop
Full Stop
A full stop (.) used to end a sentence. The full stop indicates that a point has been made and move on to further related point.
Examples:
I am going to School.
John is my good friend. He is very kind.
Question Mark
Question Mark
The question mark simply indicates that a sentence is asking a question. It always comes at the end of a sentence.
Examples:
Are you going?
What is your name?
Exclamation Mark
Exclamation Mark
An exclamation mark (!) indicates strong feeling within a sentence, such as fear, anger or love. It is also used to accentuate feeling within the written spoken word.
Examples:
Ha! Ha! Ha!
Stop! Police!
Comma Sign
Comma Sign
Comma (,) is useful in a sentence to pause before proceeding or add a phrase that does not contain any new subject or separate items on a list.
Examples:
I have books, pen, pencil and eraser in my school bag.
I speak English, French and Thai.
Semicolon Sign
Semicolon Sign
The semi-colon (;) is perhaps the most difficult sign of punctuation to use accurately. If in doubt, avoid using it and convert the added material into a new sentence.
Examples:
We set out at dawn; the weather looked promising.
The conference was attended by delegates from Paris, France; London, UK; and Mumbai, India.
Colon Sign
Colon Sign
The colon (:) within a sentence makes a very pointed pause between two phrases. It is most commonly used when listing Or it can be used within a heading, or descriptive title.
Examples:
Riya placed the following items into the trolley: fruit, vegetables and milk.
Communication Management: Guidelines for Telephone Advisers.
Ellipses
Ellipses
The ellipsis mark consists of three dots (...). We use the ellipsis mark in place of missing words. If we intentionally omit one or more words from an original text, we replace them with an ellipsis mark.
Examples:
One viewer wrote: "This is the best program...that I have ever seen."
Alisha said, "Dear, there is something...I need to tell you.
Parentheses / Brackets
Parentheses / Brackets
Parentheses or Brackets ( ) are used to make an aside, or a point which is not part of the main flow of a sentence. If you remove the words between the brackets, the sentence should still make sense.
Examples:
Mount Everest (8,848 m) is the highest mountain in the world.
I went to New york (my favorite city) for two weeks.
Square Brackets
Square Brackets
A different set of square brackets [ ] can be used to abbreviate lengthy quotations or to correct the tense of a quotation to suit the tense of your own sentence.
Examples:
Media reported that the hostages [most of them American] had been released.
He [the police officer] can’t prove they did it.
Braces / Curly Brackets
Braces / Curly Brackets
Braces are also known as curly brackets ({ }). It is mostly used in music or poetry. The only use for a brace in writing is when a writer presents a list of equal choices for a reader or in a number set.
Examples:
Choose a wine {rose, red} or a juice {apple, grape, orange}.
Choose Numbers {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}
Asterisk / Star Symbol
Asterisk / Star Symbol
The asterisk (*) is a little star symbol which can be used to indicate a footnote or be used to edit swear words in informal text. A footnote should begin on the bottom of the same page.
Examples:
Sunglasses 25% off Today Only!*
Get a new mobile phone for only $29.99*
Single Quotation Marks
Single Quotation marks
Single quotation marks (' ') are used to show (or mark) the beginning and end of a word or phrase that is somehow special or comes from outside the text that we are writing. Use single quotation marks around the title or name of a book, film, ship etc.
Examples:
'I love you,' she said.
What does ‘integrated circuit’ mean?
Double Quotation Marks
Double Quotation Marks
Double Quotation or speech marks (“….”) are used to mark out speech or when quoting someone else's speech.
Examples:
My Mom said, "Share your chocolates with your friends."
"Will you park your Car aside please?” said Mr. Jack.
Apostrophe Mark
Apostrophe mark
The apostrophe (’), sometimes called an inverted comma has two main uses. The apostrophe indicates possession or ownership or indicate where a letter is omitted:
Examples:
The boy's shirt was white, (boy is in the singular)
It’s a lovely night. (ie. It is a lovely night.)
Forward Slash Sign
Slash Sign
The slash (/) is also known as: forward slash, stroke, oblique. It can be used to indicate a choice between the words it separates, to indicate alternatives, to show a range or in some abbreviations.
Examples:
Please press your browser's Refresh/Reload button.
Accounts for the year 2006/2007.
c/o. Mr. Sam William Patric.
Hyphen / Dash Sign
Hyphen / Dash Sign
The hyphen or dash sign (-) is used to link words together. The hyphen is also used when a word is split between two lines.
Examples:
Eighteenth-century people did not use computers.
We will go to garden this week-end.
Underscore Sign
Underscore Sign
Underscore ( _ ) is a line below text-level, and is mainly used to show a space where a space is not allowed, such as in internet usernames, email addresses and some computer programs.
Examples:
my_name@example.com
lovely_heart_2007@mymail.com
Caret Sign
Caret Sign
A Caret (^) is mainly used to highlight that something is missing from the original text. In mathematics, it represents an exponent, square, cube, or other power.
Examples:
6^3 (which may also be represented as 63 or 6 * 6 * 6.)
^c ( means : control key + c )
Hash Sign
Hash Sign
The character (#) used to represent the word number; the hash sign; also called the pound sign in the US.
Examples:
This Book costs #1800.
question #2
Ampersand Mark
Ampersand Mark
Ampersand (&) marks used to clarify meaning by indicating separation of words into sentences and clauses and phrases.
Examples:
AT&T
R&D
Related Topics :
English Alphabet letters
English Alphabet letters
Articles : 'A', 'An' and 'The'
Articles 'a' 'an' and 'the' in english language
Vowels and Consonants
Vowels and Consonants in English
Parts of Speech in English
Parts of Speech in English

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