Facebook Button oogle Plus Button Contact Us
  Improve English Grammar Common Mistakes Phobias & Fear SMS English Personality Development Vocabulary KIDS Corner  
Home > English Grammar > Coordinating conjunctions
     
ENGLISH GRAMMAR
Grammar Topics
  Alphabet
  Vowels & Consonants
  Word Building
  Sentences
  Articles
  Cardinal-Ordinal Numbers
  Parts of speech
  Noun
  Pronoun
  Verb
  Adverb
  Adjective
  Preposition
  Conjunction
  Interjection
  Tenses
  Opposites
  Active & Passive Voice
  Direct & Indirect Speech
  Vocabulary building
   
   
  ENGLISH GRAMMAR  
Alphabet
Vowels & Consonants
Word Building
Sentences
Articles
Cardinal-Ordinal Numbers
Noun
Pronoun
Verb
Adverb
Adjective
Preposition
Conjunction
Interjection
Tenses
Opposites
Active & Passive Voice
Direct & Indirect Speech
Vocabulary
CONJUCTION
Types of Conjunctions Coordinating Conjunctions
Subordinating Conjunctions Correlative Conjunctions
COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS
"Join equally important two Words / phrases"

Coordinating conjunctions are used to join two words or phrases that are equally important and complete in terms of grammar when compared with each other. i.e. the sentences or words do not depend on anything to give themselves meaning.

There are seven coordinating conjunctions:
And, but, for, nor, or, so, and yet.

To remember all seven, you might want to learn one of these acronyms: FANBOYS:

F A N B O Y S
For And Nor But Or Yet So
  COORDINATING CONJUCTIONS AND THEIR USES
FOR
 
'For' is used to introduce the reason for the preceding clause:
Examples
I study English for going to Australia.
I go to Canada this summer to visit my sister, for I long to see her.
AND
 
'And' is used to connect words, phrases, and clauses.
Examples
Jack and Jill went up the hill.
Gold and Silver are precious metals.
Most children like chocolates and pizzas.
NOR
 
'Nor' is used for negative expressions:
Examples
Gita did not return that night, nor the night after.
He could not speak, nor could he understand anything we said.
BUT
 
'But' is a coordinate conjunction joining clauses of equal significance in the sentence.
Examples
He reads magazines but he doesn't like to read books.
The water was warm, but I didn't go swimming.
OR
  To introduce an alternative:
 
Examples
You pursue or you lag behind.
You must eat or starve.
You may take this pen or that one.
 
Note: There may be several alternatives each joined to the preceding one by ‘or’, presenting a choice between any two in the series eg. He may study medicine or law or engineering, computers or he may enter into business.
  To introduce an alternative name or synonym / antonym:
 
Examples
The violin or fiddle has become the leading instrument of the fusion music.
You can come early or go late.
  To mean otherwise:
 
Examples
We must be quick or we will miss the train.
You go home or come with us.
  As nearly equivalent to:
 
Examples
They are not lacking in strength or spirit, but motivation.
Do you like tea or coffee?
YET
 
It is used for talking or asking about something that has not happened or is not true at a particular time but will probably happen or be true in the future.
Examples
I'm amazed that you haven't told him anything yet.
She hasn't yet decided if she wants to come or not.
SO
 
'So' is used when you are emphasizing a fact by saying what the result of it is.
Examples
There weren't enough beds, so I had to sleep on the floor.
Waiter ignored his serving, so I got a spoon and ate it myself.
You may also like to see
Types of Conjunctions Coordinating Conjunctions
Subordinating Conjunctions Correlative Conjunctions